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Atlas Porter

Prologue

A writer’s life is a lonely one — so much time is spent in solitude — apart from the outside world. Hours are consumed by days, and just as quickly days are gobbled up by months. Holidays and full moons sit like food crumbs on time’s cold, hungry lips.

All these lonely hours of writing lead the people in your life (the few who are willing to put up with your constant absence) to reach out to you from time to time. “So how’s your writing going?” Each of my parents will ask me this in their own ways…


“Okay, Professor! We’re coming down!” I heard a student shout from the second floor window, just above me, as I was entering the Hamilton building for my three o’clock class. I then turned to look in the direction the bespectacled student was shouting. I saw a man in his early to mid-forties with long sandy blond hair and a messier, slightly darker beard that was starting to gray at its bristly ends. This guy is a professor? I thought to myself.

It sure was strange to see a college professor wearing jeans to class. What was even more peculiar was…


[*Spoiler Alert: If you have not read The Old Man and the Sea, and do not wish to know the ending, stop reading now.]

The Old Man and the Sea is a deceptively simple story about an old fisherman named Santiago, who has had a long string of bad luck. That is until he catches the largest fish he has ever seen. It is the battle of his life — both physically and mentally.

I say that this story is deceptively simple, not only because of its terse language, which seems to be just one declarative sentence after another, but…


Were his teeth missing or were they just stained? If it was the latter, they were the darkest brown imaginable. It was also difficult to tell where his bushy beard ended, and where the mat of his salt and pepper chest hair began. It was like the laws of physics ceased to exist in that bristled old mane; the hair was at once so dry it looked like you could snap the ends right off, while at the same time it always seemed sticky and damp.

No one knew who he was or when exactly he arrived, but he slept…


I am up, but I am not yet awake.

The sun has yet to rise; the night still lurks in the shadows. If it weren’t for the bird chirping in the distance, there would be no sign at all that the day was dawning. Even the clock is more confusing than informative right now. It has one of those once-a-day times on it. In that, I usually only see a time like “4:37” once a day. What does it all mean? I forget myself as I stare blankly at the numbers on the clock from my spot on the edge…


(*This Essay Originally Appeared on www.thegodofabraham.com)

Part I: A Literary Enigma

Leading biblical scholar Mark Goodacre describes the Synoptic Problem as “possibly the greatest literary enigma in history.”[1] Please do not mistake his words for hyperbole. This biblical puzzle has challenged, confounded, and captivated minds of theologians, philosophers, and frankly, all deep thinking individuals who have been clued in on the issue, for nearly two thousand years. …


Time is an interesting concept. How we understand time shapes our existence in more ways than we often care to acknowledge. If I were to ask you what year it is, you would say “2021.” If I were to ask you why it is 2021, you may look at me with a confused expression on your face, as if to say, “what do mean?”

I do not think that we think about why it is the year it is as often as we should.

Prior to modern scholars bastardizing our universal time designations, we collectively understood exactly what our year…


After man sinned against God in the Garden of Eden, God punished man. God said to Adam, “Cursed is the ground because of you; in toil you shall eat of it all the days of your life” (Genesis 3:17). In other words, God punished man with the invention of labor. From then on, man would have to work in order to survive. If he didn’t work he would die, simple as that. Many people often simplify the story of the fall of man and say that sin caused the punishment of death, and that’s it. This assessment overlooks the work…


The 1.5 trillion dollar student loan crisis is completely changing the landscape of our nation, both figuratively and literally. According to a survey in Business Insider, 13% of those with student loans have put off starting a family because of their debt burden. This rising number of young adults, delaying basic biological functions, is having a very real effect on our development as a nation. According to the Brookings Institute, population growth in the US hit an 80 year low in 2018. Moreover, because those with student loan debt have put off starting families, there has predictably become less of…


www.monetaryodyssey.com

In describing the sheer magnitude of a trillion dollars, Ronald Reagan once said that if you had a stack of thousand dollar bills in your hand just four inches high, you would have a million dollars. For that same stack to equal a trillion dollars, it would have to be 67 miles in the sky. This eye-opening anecdote leads us right into the topic at hand and shows us why this current crisis is such a big deal. That is to say, one of the biggest problems our society currently faces is a nearly 1.6 trillion-dollar student loan debt, which…

Atlas Porter

"Writing to Uplift the World"

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